The purpose of this site is for information and a record of Gerry McCann's Blog Archives. As most people will appreciate GM deleted all past blogs from the official website. Hopefully this Archive will be helpful to anyone who is interested in Justice for Madeleine Beth McCann. Many Thanks, Pamalam

Note: This site does not belong to the McCanns. It belongs to Pamalam. If you wish to contact the McCanns directly, please use the contact/email details campaign@findmadeleine.com    

McCanns Return To Portugal / Fun Run / Aled Jones Interview*

MCCANN FILES HOME BACK TO GERRY MCCANNS BLOGS HOME PAGE PHOTOGRAPHS
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McCanns interview with SIC, 09 March 2010
"Do you consider the possibility of Madeleine not being alive?"

The McCanns arrive in Lisbon, on 09 March 2010, apparently to collect the 2,000 page dossier of 'sightings', and give interviews to SIC, RTP and 24horas.

This is quickly followed by a fun run in support of the charity 'Missing People' and Kate's appearance on Good Morning Sunday, with Aled Jones, broadcast on Mothering Sunday, 14 March 2010.

McCanns return to Portugal, 09 March 2010
McCanns return to Portugal RTP

09 March 2010
Thanks to Joana Morais for text

The McCann couple have today given various interviews in Lisbon. It appears the couple have returned to Portugal to collect the several files of the information sent to the PJ in Portimão, they have also met with their Portuguese lawyers to request that the information is made confidential. And, no they have not yet requested the Portuguese Public Ministry to re-open the process, instead they have accused the Public Ministry of releasing some documentation to the English media.

The above is an excerpt of the interview made by the Portuguese journalist Sandra Felgueiras, the full interview will be broadcast tomorrow on RTP.

-------------------------

Transcript

By Nigel Moore

Sandra Fegueiras: Hi Kate. Hi Gerry. Errr... Have you already had access to the new sightings that were released last week?

Gerry McCann: We've now got them, errm... but, as I say, Kate and I haven't actually, errr... gone through them ourselves.

SF: You have watched, for sure, the picture, errr... that has been broadcast last week in... by British media, errr... of, errr... apparently, errr... a girl looking like Madeleine, in New Zealand. As parents, did that girl look like Madeleine to you?

Kate McCann: You know, she's not dissimilar to Madeleine. I actually thought she maybe looked a little bit young but, as you know, that little girl has been identified now anyway, so we know it's not Madeleine.

SF: Kate, as a mum, have you ever seen any picture, any video, that for you it could be Madeleine?

KM: No. (laughs) Errm... To be honest we don't get shown a lot of the photographs anyway, errm... I think the police decided that there's... there's so many photographs that get sent to them and, you know, clips of CCTV that it's...

SF: Do you fear that the re-opening of the case, that you wish can re-open the leads, that turn you as formal suspects in the case? Do you think about it?

GM: Definitely not. It is not the slightest piece of concern for us.

SF: I don't know if you are aware that... that, errr... that in Portugal we have a 12-years, errr... old boy missing. What do you have to say to this parents?

KM: Don't give up hope, keep going, don't let others try and grind you down, keep going for your child and you must keep going until they're found. And good luck.

McCanns interview with SIC, 09 March 2010
McCanns interview SIC

09 March 2010

Transcript

By Nigel Moore

Sara Antunes de Oliveira: You're talking about, a lot of times, of that new information, new leads, new pictures. Can you tell us something about that? What kind of information?

Gerry McCann: Kate and I haven't gone through all the information. Errr... We know that it's predominantly sightings, errm... from many different places around the world, errr... but including sightings from Spain and Portugal.

SAO: And that information still isn't enough for you to ask for the re-opening of the case here in Portugal?

Kate McCann: I think we need to go through it all first of all and organise it, really, and then we can get a file... a document together, errm... to present.

SAO: What are you doing to re-open the case?

GM: Well, the first thing that has been done is that the... the information is only just been passed on to, errr... Dave Edgar, our investigation officer, and he will look at all of the information, the leads, or this... potential sightings and other information and analyse it and see what information he can, errr... take from it, applying the same principles he does to anyone who contacts us directly with information.

SAO: Don't you fear that if the case is re-opened you might be considered suspects again?

KM: It's never even crossed my mind and I think anybody who went through that file and has a certain amount of logic will know that it's ridiculous. I don't have any fear of that.

SAO: This is not the first time, errr... where you say that some leads, that some pictures, that some witnesses were not valued by the Portuguese police and you think they are relevant and important?

KM: We can't comment too much on what's in this file of information we've just got because we haven't been through it thoroughly. What we do know is that very credible information has been passed on and our investigators have got 30 years plus experience and would only pass on credible information 'cause there's no point otherwise, and we haven't had any feedback from that. So, based on that, I feel more could have been done for those leads, which is still waiting to be acted on, errm... but our investigators obviously can't do that themselves, we need cooperation. Can't comment on what's on... in the file that's just been released.

GM: I think, you know, I'll go back to your question, we're not sitting here saying the PJ are doing a rubbish job; we're not saying that. Errr... A lot of good work has been done. We know, particularly in the early days, that we got a much more substantial search than many other people who've lost children, errm... and we appreciate that, and we appreciate the hard work. Obviously, we're still in the stage where Madeleine is missing; whoever's taken her is still out there and we need to find Madeleine and the perpetrators need to be caught and as parents it's not good enough for us that information is discounted. The specific point is, really, that you have an officer who's testified in court that he believes that Madeleine is dead, errr... who is primarily responsible for recording that information. I don't think he's objective in his work and that is one of the things that has been very difficult for us.

SAO: Do you want him to be removed from the case?

GM: Well, you know, obviously that's not for out judgement, errr... but what we need to know is that there is someone objectively looking at the information.

SAO: Do you fear... you won your first court case against Gonçalo Amaral, do you fear that with all the cases, the court cases you have against him, some people might think that it became an obsession for you?

GM: It's an obsession for us to find Madeleine, that's, errr... certainly true, errm... the court case is very important, I think, because we can understand why a large proportion of the population here would be prepared to believe that Madeleine was dead and I think challenging what has been said and making it be put up to scrutiny and the lack of objectivity of what has been proposed and the lack of evidence.

SAO: Do you understand the people that think that rather strange that you spend a lot of energy and emotional resources in this court cases, errm... against Gonçalo Amaral when your grief and your loss is much bigger than anything else?

KM: The sad thing about all this court case is, it was uneccessary. It's caused us extra pain and suffering and resources. You know, the last thing we wanted to do was have to be in a court case but Gonçalo Amaral did what he did. We totally believe it's damaged the search for our little girl and we have to do everything in our power to find her, so he has made us take this action because we love our little girl and we want to find her. That's why we've done what we've done.

SAO: Do you consider the posibility of, errm... Madeleine not being alive?

KM: Well, obviously there's a possibility because we don't know, errm... you know, we're not gonna sit here and lie and be totally naive and say: "She's 100% alive" but we do know there's a very good chance she's alive and while that chance is there we have to keep looking for her. We owe that... we all owe that to Madeleine; she's a little girl, you know, and we know from other cases, you know, there's a chance she's alive, so you have to keep going.

----------------


Body language: The McCanns reaction to being asked if they consider the possibility of Madeleine not being alive.

McCanns, SIC interview, 09 March 2010
Do you consider the posibility of, errm... Madeleine not being alive?

McCanns, SIC interview, 09 March 2010
Well, obviously there's a possibility because we don't know...

McCanns, SIC interview, 09 March 2010
We're not gonna sit here and lie...

McCann couple says information that was handed over to English journalists harms the search for their daughter, 09 March 2010
McCann couple says information that was handed over to English journalists harms the search for their daughter ionline

Madeleine poster

Lusa Agency
09 March 2010
Thanks to Astro for translation


Today, the McCann couple considered that information concerning Madeleine's whereabouts, that was published by British newspapers last week, seriously harms the search for the little girl that went missing in the Algarve, in 2007.

Gerry and Kate, who were in Lisbon today for a meeting with the Portuguese lawyers, have requested for the data concerning Madeleine to be carefully analysed and that access to that information is confidential and sensitive, so the witnesses can also be protected.

"There is lots of information and much of it has not been carefully analysed. If there was some potential and important information, we could give people a path," said Kate, accusing the Attorney General's Office of having handed documents over to British newspapers.

Kate, the mother, stressed that the publication of the data "is a serious damage to the search" for her daughter, even because it can provoke "lack of trust in the witnesses".

"Names and details have been published in the media and that has rendered the witnesses vulnerable," she said, while Gerry McCann went further: "The process was once very closed and nothing was known due to the judicial secrecy. Now, information is being released."

"It is imperative that authorities assume the responsibility over sensitive or confidential information. We, the parents, and everyone need assurances that this situation will not be permitted in the future," he stated, appealing to sensibility and confidentiality in the publication of information.

Gerry even stated that "one step back" was made in the search for Madeleine and he reiterated the desire for cooperation, considering it is "important to look objectively" at the leads.

"As parents, we can be very close to the investigation and demand things that were not done yet, to be done," he stressed, adding: "There is a strong reason for us to have to work with the authorities and in an intense way. The process is closed, but it is not concluded."

The parents of Madeleine McCann, who disappeared from an apartment at a resort in Praia da Luz, further appealed to journalists "not to spread information" and to avoid "commercial interests".

On the 3rd of March, the British newspapers published a video surveillance image from New Zealand, with a little girl that resembled Madeleine, which was part of a set of leads that the Portuguese Polícia Judiciária (PJ) did not investigate.

Several newspapers, including The Sun and the Daily Mail, mention that the Portuguese authorities possess an archive of over two thousand pages with information that was collected since the investigation was archived, in July of 2008.

Among the alleged leads, there are testimonies of sightings in Portugal, France and Spain which, according to the newspapers, were not considered as reliable by the investigative authorities.

Madeleine McCann went missing on the 3rd of May, 2007, only a few days before she would be four years old, from an apartment in Praia da Luz, in the vicinity of Lagos, in the Algarve, where she was spending holidays with her family.

Since then, the parents keep a campaign to try to find their daughter, whose investigation in Portugal was closed due to a lack of evidence.

McCanns' detective asserts that if Maddie was dead her body would have been found by now, 10 March 2010
McCanns' detective asserts that if Maddie was dead her body would have been found by now RTP

Posted online: 2010-03-10 20:58:42
(Interview: 09 March 2010)
Thanks to Joana Morais for this translated text


The private detective that was hired by the McCann couple asserts that if Madeleine was dead, her body would have been found by now. Retired from the English police, Dave Edgar has, in his curriculum, the discovery of a missing child. He accompanied Kate and Gerry on the trip that they made to Portugal this week, whose primary purpose it was for them to gain access to the leads that arrived at the PJ since the case was shelved, one and a half year ago.

------------------

Transcript

By Nigel Moore

Gerry McCann: The biggest fear for us is that it puts Madeleine in danger, errr... I think there are many...

Kate McCann: Or makes the chances of... of... of us finding her much more difficult.

Sandra Felgueiras: When you think about dangers, what kind of things do you think about?

GM: It's very difficult, isn't it? In terms of, errm... because until you know who's taken her, you've no idea, and there's been many different scenarios, errr... by which children are taken and have been held for very long periods of time, including years, and to the outward world they seem to be living a normal life. I think with a... a young child, in particular, the chances of taking them to, errr... a new environment and they're... and adapting is greater.

SF: You confess that you think that some of these leads should have been better investigated. But last week, errr... the Portuguese Public General Attorney said that all the leads that were recently, errr... reported to the PJ after July 2008, errr... were totally investigated and none... none was sufficiently reliable to reopen the case. Why do you think that the General Public Attorney would say that if, errr... this wasn't true?

GM: The first thing we have to do is to... to look at the information but, from what we have seen so far, is, the same thing has been written about each individual piece of information and there is no evidence of the... in the information that has been disclosed but, you know, it's not acceptable to parents of a missing child for everything to be discounted. You know, it doesn't matter what the information, it's just discounted, and that is not acceptable and if it's better for us as a family for the file to be open then that... that's what we'll press for.

(...)

Dave Edgar: Five or six occasions we have followed really positive lines of inquiry

SF: Do you still believe that it is possible to find Madeleine alive?

DE: Of course, it is. Of course, it is. Errm... No body has been found, errr... and my experience in these cases, errm... if the child's been killed, they dump the body virtually straight away; because obviously these people don't want to be associated with the body.

(...)

SF: From all that have been talked, errr... through all this time, there's any that touched you most, that you kept thinking about it, could have been her?

GM: I mean the things that, errr... are the most obvious are the sightings on the night of a... a child being carried; two separate things in Praia da Luz, errm... but since then I don't think there's been anything, errm... that I've really... there's been one or two I've looked at twice.

SF: Can you tell me which were they?

GM: Can't remember the specific, errr...

KM: There was one, wasn't there? Errr... I don't know if that was Amsterdam or Brussels

GM: Errr... There was one like that.

KM: And that was what, we had to look at it a few...

-------------------------

Screenshot sequence 1

McCanns interview with RTP, 09 March 2010

Sandra Felgueiras asks the McCanns if, from all the reported sightings, there are any that they "kept thinking about"; that "could have been" Madeleine.

----------------------------


Screenshot sequence 2

McCanns interview with RTP, 09 March 2010

Gerry McCann proceeds to describe the two separate 'sightings' of Madeleine, allegedly being carried away in the arms of an abductor, on the night of May 3rd. For some reason he finds this amusing.

---------------------------


Screenshot sequence 3

McCanns interview with RTP, 09 March 2010

In relation to possible sightings, Gerry McCann adds: "there's been one or two I've looked at twice". But when pressed by Sandra Felgueiras to say "which they were", he is unable to remember anything "specific" about any of the sightings of his missing daughter. Kate "doesn't know" either but thinks there was one in "Amsterdam or Brussels".

-----------------------

Dave Edgar

Dave Edgar in RTP interview, 09 March 2010

Is it possible to find Madeleine alive? "Of course, it is. Of course, it is," insists Dave Edgar, the McCanns' private investigator - but as he speaks his head markedly shakes, from side-to-side, suggesting a different answer is being suppressed.

Kate's comfort in Maddie bedroom, 10 March 2010
Kate's comfort in Maddie bedroom The Sun

Comfort ... Kate goes to Maddie room twice a day

By ANTONELLA LAZZERI
Published: Today (10 March 2010)

KATE McCann has revealed she seeks strength by visiting missing daughter Madeleine's bedroom twice a day.

The mum-of-three said the room at their home in Rothley, Leics, is still the way it was when Maddie vanished from the Algarve resort of Praia da Luz nearly three years ago.

During a visit to Lisbon yesterday with husband Gerry to meet their Portuguese lawyer, she said: "We haven't changed anything.

"There's still a lot of pink. I continue to go to Madeleine's room twice a day. It's a comforting feeling."

Insisting in an interview with Portuguese daily 24 horas they had not lost hope of finding Madeleine alive, Gerry added: "There are several cases, some recent, of missing children that were found.

"That makes us believe our daughter could be alive and that's why we continue to have hope."

Dossier

The McCanns' visit to Portugal came after an Algarve court released new files on their daughter's disappearance.

The 2,000 page dossier covers dozens of possible sightings Portuguese detectives appear to have failed to follow up.

The couple, both 41, criticised the disclosure, claiming it jeopardised the search for Maddie.

Appealing for media organisations with access to the files not to publish further information on possible sightings, Gerry said: "If it was divulged it could be very bad for our private investigators."

Isabel Duarte, the McCanns' Portuguese lawyer, insisted: "Innocent lives including Madeleine's life itself could be at risk."

Miles for Missing People

Madeleine's Mum In Missing People Run, 11 March 2010
Madeleine's Mum In Missing People Run Sky News

Carole Erskine, Sky News Online
3:49am UK, Thursday March 11, 2010


The mother of Madeleine McCann is taking part in a charity run to raise money to help find missing people.

Kate McCann has vowed to keep hunting for her missing daughter
Kate McCann has vowed to keep hunting for her missing daughter

Kate McCann will join the 10km Miles for Missing People run, taking place in London's Hyde Park on Saturday, with other families whose loved ones have vanished.

Rachel Elias, sister of former Manic Street Preachers guitarist Richey Edwards, who went missing in 1995, will be attending the event.

Nicki Durbin, whose son Luke disappeared in 2006, is also set to run.

Mrs McCann, 42, and her husband Gerry, 41, from Rothley, Leicestershire, were on holiday with their three children in Praia da Luz in Portugal when Madeleine went missing in May 2007.

She said: "I'm running the Miles for Missing People for all missing children.

"Gerry and I know the pain that having Madeleine missing has caused us, but sadly we are not alone.

"There are thousands of families across the UK waiting for news.

"That's why Missing People provides support for missing children, vulnerable adults and families left behind, and we want to do all we can to help them."

Mrs McCann is raising funds for her run at uk.virginmoneygiving.com/katemccann1.

----------------------------------

Miles for Missing People virginmoneygiving.com

 
Miles for Missing People: Kate McCann

Fundraiser: Kate McCann
My page: http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/KateMcCann1


I'm running Miles for Missing People for all missing children. Gerry and I know the pain that having Madeleine missing has caused us, but sadly we are not alone. There are thousands of families across the UK waiting for news. That's why Missing People provides support for missing children, vulnerable adults and families left behind, and we want to do all we can to help them. We will be raising money for the charity's vital work and we hope people around the country will join us as we remember missing children everywhere.

--------------------------


Event details

Miles for Missing People

13 March 2010

On Saturday 13 March 2010 families of the missing will be joined by hundreds of supporters to run 6.2 miles (10k) in Hyde Park, London in memory of missing loved ones.

Updates, 13 March 2010

 
findmadeleine.com update, 13 March 2010

Update: Saturday 13th March 2010

Today we joined hundreds of runners to take part in a 10km run in Hyde Park to support the work of the charity 'Missing People' (http://www.missingpeople.org.uk/).

'Miles for Missing People' is the first of what will now be an annual event.

Many relatives who also have a family member missing (through a variety of different circumstances) came to support the event and raise awareness for all missing children and adults.

We want to thank Martin Houghton-Brown and the team at Missing People for organising today's run, and of course for all their commitment and hard work, despite limited resources and recognition.

We would also like to thank everyone who came to run and/or show their support today, as well as all those who have very generously sponsored me and the other runners.

Events like that today, help to remind the world that these children and adults are still missing. By supporting such a cause, we are all giving them a much needed chance of being found - and hopefully reunited with their family.

McCanns join run to help charity, 13 March 2010
McCanns join run to help charity The Press Association

The parents of Madeleine McCann have joined 450 runners to take part in a fun run for missing people

(UKPA) - 13 March 2010

The parents of Madeleine McCann have joined 450 runners to take part in a 10km fun run for missing people.

Gerry and Kate McCann lined up together alongside other families whose loved ones vanished at the first ever Miles for Missing People in London's Hyde Park.

The couple wore matching white T-shirts bearing a smiling picture of their daughter and the words "Don't give up on me".

Mrs McCann, 42, and her husband Gerry, 41, from Rothley, Leicestershire, were on holiday with their three children in Praia da Luz in Portugal when Madeleine went missing in May 2007.

In an earlier statement, Mrs McCann said: "Gerry and I know the pain that having Madeleine missing has caused us, but sadly we are not alone. There are thousands of families across the UK waiting for news.

"That's why Missing People provides support for missing children, vulnerable adults and families left behind, and we want to do all we can to help them."

Among the runners was Rachel Elias, 40, from Blackwood, Gwent, south Wales, sister of former Manic Street Preachers guitarist Richey Edwards, who went missing in February 1995.

She said: "I am running it for my brother and for all the other people who have disappeared and to support the work of this charity. They have been a tremendous source of strength over the last 15 years."

McCanns In Charity Run For Missing People, 13 March 2010
McCanns In Charity Run For Missing People Sky News

Huw Borland, Sky News Online
1:05pm UK, Saturday March 13, 2010


The parents of Madeleine McCann have joined 450 runners to take part in a 10km charity run for missing people.

Gerry, 41, and Kate McCann, 42, lined up at the first ever Miles for Missing People in London's Hyde Park, alongside other families whose loved ones vanished.

The couple wore matching white T-shirts bearing a smiling picture of their daughter and the words "Don't give up on me".

Mrs McCann and her husband Gerry, from Rothley, Leicestershire, were on holiday with their three children in Praia da Luz, Portugal, when Madeleine went missing in May 2007.

In an earlier statement, Mrs McCann said: "Gerry and I know the pain that having Madeleine missing has caused us, but sadly we are not alone.

"There are thousands of families across the UK waiting for news.

"That's why Missing People provides support for missing children, vulnerable adults and families left behind, and we want to do all we can to help them."

Rachel Elias, 40, from South Wales, sister of former Manic Street Preachers guitarist Richey Edwards, who went missing in February 1995, was among the runners.

She said: "I am running it for my brother and for all the other people who have disappeared and to support the work of this charity.

"They have been a tremendous source of strength over the last 15 years.

Rachel Elias, sister of Richey Edwards, Nicki Durbin and Kate and Gerry McCann
Rachel Elias, sister of Richey Edwards, Nicki Durbin and Kate and Gerry McCann

"(Edwards) was legally declared dead in November 2008, but there is no certainty over the loss, there is that hope.

"There are moments when you swing between hope and despair, sometimes you feel different emotions at the same time which can be very confusing."

Nicki Durbin, 41, from Suffolk, whose son Luke disappeared in 2006 aged 19 following an evening at a nightclub in Ipswich, also supported the event.

McCanns lead in charity race, 13 March 2010
McCanns lead in charity race djgreetings.com

13 March 2010

The parents of Madeleine McCann run 10km to raise money for a missing people charity.

McCanns join run to help charity, 13 March 2010
McCanns join run to help charity Metro video

The parents of Madeleine McCann have joined 450 runners to take part in a 10km fun run for missing people.

13th March 2010

Gerry and Kate McCann lined up together alongside other families whose loved ones vanished at the first ever Miles for Missing People in London's Hyde Park.

The couple wore matching white T-shirts bearing a smiling picture of their daughter and the words "Don't give up on me".

Mrs McCann, 42, and her husband Gerry, 41, from Rothley, Leicestershire, were on holiday with their three children in Praia da Luz in Portugal when Madeleine went missing in May 2007.

In an earlier statement, Mrs McCann said: "Gerry and I know the pain that having Madeleine missing has caused us, but sadly we are not alone. There are thousands of families across the UK waiting for news.

"That's why Missing People provides support for missing children, vulnerable adults and families left behind, and we want to do all we can to help them."

Among the runners was Rachel Elias, 40, from Blackwood, Gwent, south Wales, sister of former Manic Street Preachers guitarist Richey Edwards, who went missing in February 1995.

She said: "I am running it for my brother and for all the other people who have disappeared and to support the work of this charity. They have been a tremendous source of strength over the last 15 years."

------------------------------

Transcript

By Nigel Moore

Kirsten O'Brien: When somebody goes missing it's... it's... it's just the most extraordinary experience because you... it's out of character, most of the time. I mean, speaking from experience, it was out of character, errm... and so you just spend your time searching for them in your mind, thinking: 'where have we been?', 'where is he like to...?', 'where has he got friends?' and physically searching, you know, I would sit on the tube and think Mark was such a striking person that I would think I saw him all the time and, you know, as I say, we did have an end to that, which was awful, but to think that people are doing that perpetually for the rest of their lives is just... it's a horrible, horrible situation to be in.

Kate and Gerry McCann wear Madeleine T-shirts as they join charity run for missing people, 13 March 2010
Kate and Gerry McCann wear Madeleine T-shirts as they join charity run for missing people Daily Mail

By DAILY MAIL REPORTER
Last updated at 4:22 PM on 13th March 2010


The parents of Madeleine McCann today joined 450 runners to take part in a 10km fun run for missing people.

Gerry and Kate McCann lined up together alongside other families whose loved ones vanished at the first ever Miles for Missing People in London's Hyde Park.

The couple wore matching white T-shirts bearing a smiling picture of their daughter and the words 'Don't give up on me'.

Their daughter Madeleine has been missing almost three years. She vanished during a family holiday to Praia da Luz in Portugal in May 2007.

Get set - go: Kate and Gerry McCann set off for the 10k 'Miles for Missing People' run in London

Get set - go: Kate and Gerry McCann set off for the 10k 'Miles for Missing People' run in London

-----------------------


Ahead of the run, Mrs McCann said: 'Gerry and I know the pain that having Madeleine missing has caused us, but sadly we are not alone. There are thousands of families across the UK waiting for news.

'That's why Missing People provides support for missing children, vulnerable adults and families left behind, and we want to do all we can to help them.'

Among the runners was Rachel Elias, 40, from Blackwood, Gwent, south Wales, sister of former Manic Street Preachers guitarist Richey Edwards, who went missing in February 1995.

She said: 'I am running it for my brother and for all the other people who have disappeared and to support the work of this charity. They have been a tremendous source of strength over the last 15 years.

'He was legally declared dead in November 2008, but there is no certainty over the loss, there is that hope. There are moments when you swing between hope and despair, sometimes you feel different emotions at the same time which can be very confusing.

'People describe a missing person as a loss. It is a loss but an ambiguous loss. Until he is found alive or dead we will always have hope.'

Limbering up: Kate McCann does some stretching as she chats to husband Gerry

Limbering up: Kate McCann does some stretching as she chats to husband Gerry

------------------------


Also supporting today's event was Nicki Durbin, 41, from Hollesley, Suffolk, whose son Luke disappeared in May 2006 aged 19 following an evening at a nightclub in Ipswich.

She said: 'My son has been missing for nearly four years. Missing People is the national charity that has helped us since Luke first went missing.

'Other families have been a lifeline, it's very important to get together and talk to people who completely understand your situation.

'I think I am constantly grieving for my son. I believe something sinister happened, but there is still that chance that he is alive. I feel I have become a master at masking my despair but it is always there.'

BBC3 television presenter Kirsten O'Brien, who worked alongside the late presenter Mark Speight, helped spur on runners as they warmed up at the start next to the bandstand accompanied by the Rock Choir.

She said: 'After Mark went missing, it really struck me how helpful it is to have a port of call for people whose loved ones or friends have gone missing. To see the charity in action struck a chord with me.

Because Mark was so funny there are times when I recall something he did and I just laugh, it's nice to have that joyous element back.'

Martin Houghton-Brown, CEO of Missing People, added: 'It is a really important day. It is not just about the families who have someone missing, it is about Britain as a whole recognising that this is an issue that can affect anybody.

'When somebody goes missing the friends and family need a huge amount of support. Missing People is there 24 hours a day, seven days a week.'

The event has already raised in excess of £20,000. The McCanns are raising funds for her run at uk.virginmoneygiving.com/katemccann1

United front: The McCanns wore T-shirts with Madeleine's picture on and the plea: 'Don't give up on me'

United front: The McCanns wore T-shirts with Madeleine's picture on and the plea: 'Don't give up on me'

-------------------

McCanns fun run for missing, 13 March 2010
McCanns fun run for missing The Sun

Fundraisers ... McCanns and other
Fundraisers ... McCanns and other

By RICHARD MORIARTY
Published: Today (13 March 2010)

THE parents of Madeleine McCann today joined 450 runners to take part in a 10km fun run for missing people.

Gerry and Kate McCann lined up together alongside other families whose loved ones vanished at the first ever Miles for Missing People in London's Hyde Park.

In a statement, Mrs McCann said: "Gerry and I know the pain that having Madeleine missing has caused us, but sadly we are not alone. There are thousands of families across the UK waiting for news.

"That's why Missing People provides support for missing children, vulnerable adults and families left behind, and we want to do all we can to help them."

The couple wore matching white T-shirts bearing a smiling picture of their daughter and the words "Don't give up on me".

Mrs McCann, 42, and her husband Gerry, 41, from Rothley, Leicestershire, were on holiday with their three children in Praia da Luz in Portugal when Madeleine went missing in May 2007.

Among the runners was Rachel Elias, 40, from Blackwood, Gwent, south Wales, sister of former Manic Street Preachers guitarist Richey Edwards, who went missing in February 1995.

She said: "I am running it for my brother and for all the other people who have disappeared and to support the work of this charity. They have been a tremendous source of strength over the last 15 years.

"He was legally declared dead in November 2008, but there is no certainty over the loss, there is that hope.

"There are moments when you swing between hope and despair, sometimes you feel different emotions at the same time which can be very confusing.

"People describe a missing person as a loss. It is a loss but an ambiguous loss. Until he is found alive or dead we will always have hope."

Also supporting today's event was Nicki Durbin, 41, from Hollesley, Suffolk, whose son Luke disappeared in May 2006 aged 19 following an evening at a nightclub in Ipswich.

BBC3 television presenter Kirsten O'Brien, who worked alongside the late BBC television presenter Mark Speight, helped spur on runners.

She said: "After Mark went missing, it really struck me how helpful it is to have a port of call for people whose loved ones or friends have gone missing. To see the charity in action struck a chord with me.

"Because Mark was so funny there are times when I recall something he did and I just laugh, it's nice to have that joyous element back."

Martin Houghton-Brown, CEO of Missing People, added: "It is a really important day. It is not just about the families who have someone missing, it is about Britain as a whole recognising that this is an issue that can affect anybody.

The event has raised in excess of £20,000.

Kate McCann: I pray for the people who have kidnapped Madeleine, 13 March 2010
Kate McCann: I pray for the people who have kidnapped Madeleine Daily Mail

Still hoping: Kate and Gerry McCann with photo of Madeleine on their T-shirts

By TRACEY KANDOHLA
Last updated at 10:00 PM on 13th March 2010


Kate McCann has admitted that she will try to find it in her heart to forgive whoever kidnapped her daughter Madeleine.

In a moving interview Kate, 42, a devout Catholic, says: 'It is hard to say but I would like to hope I could forgive. It would be a bit difficult. I just want to know why they have taken her.

'I always pray for the family. Most of the prayers are centred on Madeleine. But I pray for the people who have taken her and the people who know what has happened to her.'

Kate and her husband Gerry, 41, were among 450 people taking part in a fun run in London's Hyde Park yesterday to raise funds for the charity Missing People.

During the 10km run the couple wore tops bearing a picture of their daughter smiling and the words 'Don't give up on me'.

In the interview broadcast on Radio 2's Good Morning Sunday this weekend, Kate, from Rothley, Leicestershire, tells how she takes sanctuary alone in the village's Sacred Heart church.

She says: 'I've got the key to the church. It's kindly been given to me. It's a bit of a sanctuary - a refuge - and I can go and speak out, when no one else is there, and get it all off my chest really.'

She believes God is looking after and protecting six-year-old Maddie, who vanished from a holiday apartment in Praia da Luz, Portugal, in May 2007 just days before her fourth birthday.

She adds: 'There are times I have got angry with God but my faith has sustained me and it has got stronger.'

She said having a child snatched was 'the worst thing that could ever happen to a parent. The pain is just incredible and I cannot help but worry about her.

'The wounds are less raw now and the pain doesn't go away but I am a lot stronger than I was a year ago.'

She says enduring her third Mother's Day without her eldest child is painful and 'a constant reminder that one of my babies isn't with me'.

But she vows to 'get through it like any other day'. She adds: 'I am still Madeleine's mum and always will be.

'I just want to bring her back into the warmth and love of our family.'

Kate was expected to attend a church service in the village to mark Mothering Sunday. She is due to be given a bunch of daffodils there by her five-year-old twins Sean and Amelie.

She adds: 'The twins are really positive and keep us going. I have a lot of hope that Madeleine is still alive but the difficult task is trying to find her.'

She describes Maddie as 'an amazing little character' who has 'loads of energy, is really funny and quite knowing. I want everyone to meet her'.

Asked if she had a message for mothers who are facing similar heartache, she says: 'Dig deep and just keep hoping. Surround yourself with positive people and don't give up.'

Kate McCann: I pray for men who snatched Maddie, 14 March 2010
Kate McCann: I pray for men who snatched Maddie Daily Express

'STRONGER': Kate McCann in the London run yesterday pic: Steve Bell

By Jjane Clinton
Sunday March 14,2010


KATE McCann has revealed how she prays for those who took Madeleine and admits how she feels guilty that she is learning to adapt without her.

In an emotional Mother's Day interview, devout Catholic Kate also spoke of the comfort she gains from her twins Amelie and Sean who are convinced their sister will return.

Kate, 41, yesterday lined up alongside husband Gerry and 450 runners in a 10km fun run for missing people in London's Hyde Park.

Speaking on the BBC Radio 2 show Aled Jones with Good Morning Sunday, she said: "I pray for lots of things now. Obviously I always pray for the family and obviously the prayers are centred on Madeleine.

"I pray for the people who have taken Madeleine, the people who know what has happened to Madeleine and the people around, related to the person who has taken Madeleine. I pray for the police and the investigations people who are looking for her and I pray for all the other children who are missing or have been exploited in some way.

"I guess Mother's Day is another reminder that Madeleine is not here. Obviously I have got three children and it is a reminder that one of my babies isn't with me. But you know, I am still Madeleine's mum and I always will be." Her five-year-old twins speak of their older sister every day, she said. "Her relationship with Sean and Amelie was incredible really and that is something that still gets to me at times when I see them playing and they start talking about Madeleine.

"They know she is missing. They know she has been taken by somebody. They understand Madeleine belongs to us and it is not right that they have got Madeleine and we need to find her."

The twins have also meant that life has to go on, even if at times Kate feels guilty that she is learning to cope since Madeleine's disappearance aged three in May 2007 in Portugal. "I know it is OK to be happy," she said. "It's important for Sean and Amelie that we have happy times but there is a little bit of guilt really in being able to adapt.

"I'm definitely a lot stronger than I was a year ago, which is positive. Sometimes you beat yourself up about that, because I think: 'How come I am doing OK and I am coping better than I was? That's not right'."

Kate's interview can be heard on Radio 2 at 7am today.

Express Comment: Pain of Kate and mothers who have lost loved ones, 14 March 2010
Express Comment: Pain of Kate and mothers who have lost loved ones Daily Express

Sunday March 14,2010

FOR MOST people, today is one of the happiest of the year. Mothering Sunday is a time when the family gets together to say an overdue thank you to mothers for the care and love they lavish on us but, for some, this is a day of despair when the pain of missing loved ones cuts deep.


Kate McCann, whose daughter Madeleine went missing in Portugal almost three years ago, is one who will find today an extra torment to endure. This morning, Kate spoke bravely of her ordeal in an interview with Aled Jones on BBC Radio 2.

She explained how her faith has helped sustain her and the joy she experiences in looking after her twins Amelie and Sean. As a Christian she prays for Madeleine. She also prays for the people who took her but, perhaps not surprisingly, she cannot forgive them. "The pain is just incredible," she said. "It's hell on earth. The worst thing that could happen to a parent. We have to live with the sadness of not having Madeleine in our lives."

It must have required considerable courage to share these feelings. On Mother's Day let's think of women such as Kate and Claudia Lawrence's mother Joan and sister Ali, and the many others who endure the agony of waiting for loved ones at the family hearth.

Kate: Mother's Day too painful, 14 March 2010
Kate: Mother's Day too painful News of the World

Maddie hunt heartache leaves McCann unable to face Mother's Day

RUN: McCanns yesterday
RUN: McCanns yesterday

By Matthew Drake
14/03/2010

KATE McCann has told how the pain of searching for her missing daughter Madeleine has left her unable to face Mother's Day.

The brave GP spoke of her heartache as she and husband Gerry prepared for a 10km charity run yesterday.

The couple, wearing T-shirts printed with a picture of Madeleine and the words "Don't give up on me", shared a poignant embrace on the finish line of the Miles For Missing People event in London's Hyde Park.

And frail-looking Kate, 41, also mum to five-year-old twins Sean and Amelie, said: "Every day is quite difficult. I guess Mother's Day is another reminder that Madeleine's not here.

"I think motherhood is a real gift and obviously I've got three children and it's another reminder that one of my babies isn't with me.

"Perhaps days where we would have done something really special, we don't necessarily, certainly Mother's Day."

Speaking in a Radio 2 interview broadcast this morning Kate, from Rothley, Leics, gave a rare insight into her ordeal since Madeleine went missing aged three from Praia da Luz, Portugal, in May 2007.

"It's always funny that line that time is a healer. I think the wounds are less raw but the pain doesn't go away," she said.

"We've got hope that Madeleine is still alive."

Daily Star Sunday: McCanns are all s-miles (paper edition), 14 March 2010

Daily Star Sunday: 'McCanns are all s-miles', 14 March 2010

McCanns are all s-miles, 14 March 2010
McCanns are all s-miles Daily Star Sunday (appears in paper edition)

March 14, 2010

THE parents of Madeleine McCann yesterday joined 450 runners in a 10km charity run for missing people.

Gerry and Kate lined up at the first ever Miles For Missing People in London's Hyde Park with other families whose loved ones have vanished.

The couple wore matching white T-shirts bearing a smiling picture of their daughter and the words: "Don't give up on me."

Kate, 42, and Gerry, 41, from Rothley, Leicestershire, were on holiday with their three children in Praia da Luz in Portugal when Madeleine went missing in May 2007.

In an earlier statement, Kate said: "Gerry and I know the pain that having Madeleine missing has caused us but sadly we are not alone. There are thousands of families across the UK waiting for news."

Among the runners was Rachel Elias, 40, from Blackwood, Gwent, south Wales, sister of Manic Street Preachers guitarist Richey Edwards, who went missing in February 1995.

She said: "I am running it for my brother and for other people who have disappeared and to support the charity. It's been a source of strength over the years."

The McCanns are raising funds at uk.virginmoneygiving.com/katemccann1

Suffolk mum accepts missing son is gone, 15 March 2010
Suffolk mum accepts missing son is gone Ipswich Evening Star

KEN MCERLAIN
Last updated: 15/03/2010 06:00:00

A MOTHER whose son disappeared four years ago spoke of her trauma to entrants in a 10km fun run for missing people - which included the parents of Madeleine McCann.

Nicki Durbin, 41, from Hollesley, spoke in front of 450 runners at the first Miles for Missing People event, in London's Hyde Park, on Saturday.

Ms Durbin's 19-year-old son Luke disappeared in May 2006, following an evening out at a nightclub in Ipswich.

Speaking after the run, Ms Durbin said: "I've got to the point where I only hold out hope his body will be found.

"I believe that something sinister happened to Luke. The chances of him being alive are very slim.

"There is a possibility that Luke may be alive but not aware of who he is - your imagination is your worst nightmare in this situation. But I will never stop campaigning and fighting for his cause until they find him."

Ms Durbin has been heavily involved with the charity Missing People since Luke's disappearance, and the charity invited her to be guest speaker after the race.

She also got the chance to meet several other people with missing relatives, including Gerry and Kate McCann whose daughter Madeleine vanished while on holiday in Portugal in May 2007.

Ms Durbin added: "Speaking in front of hundreds of people was pretty nerve-wracking but I'm glad I did it.

"It was a fantastic event and good to meet so many people with a common denominator, like the McCanns.

"They still believe their daughter is alive and it was quite emotional just speaking to them and seeing how positive they are.

"Other families have been a lifeline to me, it's very important to get together and talk to people who completely understand your situation.

"That's why I'm hoping that the fun run will become a regular event and get widespread recognition."

Good Morning Sunday with Kate McCann

Good Morning Sunday, 07 March 2010
Good Morning Sunday BBC Press Office

Programme Information

Sunday 14 March
7.00-9.00am BBC RADIO 2

On Mothering Sunday, Aled Jones says Good Morning Sunday to Kate McCann, mother of missing child Madeleine McCann, who has found comfort from her Roman Catholic faith since her daughter's disappearance.

Becky Silver also discusses the news of the week from a faith perspective, and gives the Moment Of Reflection.

Presenter/Aled Jones, Producer/Hilary Robinson

BBC response to complaint about the forthcoming appearance of Kate McCann on Good Morning Sunday, 11 March 2010
BBC Complaints response

11 March 2010

Thank you for your e-mail regarding 'Aled Jones with Good Morning Sunday'.

We're sorry if you feel Kate McCann is an inappropriate guest for Mothering Sunday.

The guests on 'Good Morning Sunday' reflect the impact of faith on their lives in many different ways. Over the last few years the guests on Mothering Sunday have all told powerful personal stories in which their religious belief has played an important part. Included among those stories has been the death of a child and coping with illness.

The interview with Kate McCann offers a similar opportunity for the listeners to hear someone talk about how their faith has sustained them through the experience of trying to come to terms with a missing child and the effect this has had on their family.

Nevertheless, we appreciate the time you've taken to make us aware of your feelings about this topic.

We'd like to assure you that we have registered your comments on our audience log. This is the internal report of audience feedback which we compile daily for all programme makers and commissioning executives within the BBC, and also their senior management. It ensures that your points, and all other comments we receive, are circulated and considered across the BBC.

Thank you once again for taking the trouble to contact us.

Regards

BBC Complaints
____________________________
www.bbc.co.uk/complaints

Madeleine mum prays for gang, 14 March 2010
Madeleine mum prays for gang The People

By Tracey Kandohla
14 March 2010


Kate McCann admits today she prays for daughter Madeleine's kidnappers and hopes she can forgive them.

Devout Catholic Kate, 42 - who yesterday took part in a missing persons charity run in London with her doctor husband Gerry, 41 - said: "It is hard to say but I hope I could forgive. It would be a bit difficult. I just want to know why they did it."

Speaking on Radio 2's Good Morning Sunday, the brave mum added: "I always pray for the family. Most of the prayers are centred on Madeleine. I pray for the people who have taken Madeleine and the people who know what has happened to her."

Kate believes God is looking after sixyear-old Maddie, who vanished from a Portuguese holiday flat three years ago.

This morning the mum is being presented with daffodils by her five-yearold twins Sean and Amelie at a Mothering Sunday service at their local church in Rothley, Leics.

Madeleine Mum Prays For Daughter's Abductors, 14 March 2010
Madeleine Mum Prays For Daughter's Abductors Sky News

Jo Couzens, Sky News Online
5:16am UK, Sunday March 14, 2010


Kate McCann prays for the people who took her daughter Madeleine, she has revealed.

She also says her belief in God gave her an "inner strength" on the day Portuguese police made her a suspect or "arguido" in the little girl's disappearance.

Mrs McCann, 42, a Roman Catholic, used a Mother's Day interview to talk about how she has been helped by her faith since her daughter went missing in Portugal in May 2007.

She told Aled Jones, presenter of BBC Radio 2's Good Morning Sunday, that her prayers were "a little bit more directed" than they were before Madeleine vanished.

"I pray for lots of things now. Obviously I always pray for the family, obviously most of the prayers are centred on Madeleine," she said.

"But I pray for the people who have taken Madeleine, the people who know what's happened to Madeleine and the people around and related to the person who's taken Madeleine.

"I pray for the police and the investigators, the people who are looking for her. And I pray for all the other children who are missing or have been exploited in some way."

Madeleine was nearly four when she went missing from her family's holiday flat in Praia da Luz in the Algarve on May 3, 2007 as her parents dined with friends nearby.

Mrs McCann recalled: "The day I was going in for my arguido interview was quite a strange day because I had been really low and feeling quite weak and fragile.

"Then suddenly I just felt really strong. I was angry, I was angry that people hadn't been looking for Madeleine.

"But also I just thought to myself, 'I know the truth and God knows the truth, and nothing else matters'. And I just felt really strong from there, I felt a real inner strength."

Mrs McCann, from Rothley, Leicestershire, told how she takes refuge in her local church while it is empty and speaks aloud about her burdens.

"These are the times when I go off to church, to be honest. I've got a key to the church - they've kindly given me one," she explained.

"Sometimes I'll go in - it's a bit of a sanctuary, a bit of a refuge. I'll go and I can speak out, because obviously there's no one there, just get it all off my chest, really."

Mrs McCann said she and her husband Gerry, 41, have been greatly supported by the positive attitude of their other two children, five-year-old twins Sean and Amelie.

"I think in years to come I'll be able to tell Sean and Amelie just how important they have been in our life and keeping us going, and getting us through it all," she said.

She said spending Mothering Sunday without Madeleine was hard, adding: "Every day, to be honest, is quite difficult.

"I guess Mother's Day is another reminder really that Madeleine is not here.

"I think motherhood is a real gift. Obviously I've got three children, and it's another reminder that one of my babies isn't with me."

Madeleine's mother Kate McCann 'prays for abductors', 14 March 2010
Madeleine's mother Kate McCann 'prays for abductors' BBC News

Page last updated at 09:11 GMT, Sunday, 14 March 2010

The mother of Madeleine McCann has said she prays for the people who abducted her missing daughter in 2007.

"Obviously most prayers are centred on Madeleine. But I pray for the people who have taken [her]," she said.

In a Mother's Day interview on BBC Radio 2 Kate McCann also said her faith had given her an "inner strength" when police named her a suspect in the case.

Since Madeleine vanished in Praia da Luz they had been "lucky" to have so much support, added Mrs McCann.

"It's funny to say lucky, but we have been lucky - we've had a lot of support from the general public, in particular people we don't know. We've had incredible support.

"There's many families out there whose children have gone missing and you don't hear about it."

'Weak and fragile'

Mrs McCann said the pain and worry for Madeleine was "incredible" but she had begun to cope better with their ordeal over the past year.

However, sometimes she felt "guilt" about having happy times with the couple's other children, five-year-old twins Sean and Amelie, she added.

She told Aled Jones, presenter of BBC Radio 2's Good Morning Sunday, her faith had helped sustain her over the last three years.

Her prayers were "a little bit more directed" than they were before Madeleine disappeared, she said.

As well as praying for her daughter, and for those who knew what had happened to her, she said she prayed for "the police and the investigators, the people who are looking for her".

"And I pray for all the other children who are missing or have been exploited in some way."

When Portuguese detectives investigating Madeleine's disappearance interviewed her as an "arguido", or formal suspect, in September 2007 she said it was a "strange day".

"I had been really low and feeling quite weak and fragile. Then suddenly I just felt really strong. I was angry, I was angry that people hadn't been looking for Madeleine.

"But also I just thought to myself, 'I know the truth and God knows the truth, and nothing else matters'. And I just felt really strong from there, I felt a real inner strength."

Mrs McCann, from Rothley, Leicestershire, told the programme she took refuge in her local church - for which she has her own key - while it was empty, speaking aloud about her feelings.

"I've never blamed God for what's happened at all. I don't think that was anything to do with God," she said.

"There are times when I've got angry with God - certainly the additional things... that have happened where I just think, 'how can we have extra suffering put on us at such an awful time?'"

Mrs McCann said she and her husband Gerry, 41, had also been greatly supported by the positive attitude of Sean and Amelie.

"I think in years to come I'll be able to tell [them] just how important they have been in our life and keeping us going, and getting us through it all," she said.

She said spending Mothering Sunday without Madeleine was hard but they will "get through it like any other day".

"Every day, to be honest, is quite difficult. I guess Mother's Day is another reminder really that Madeleine is not here.

"I think motherhood is a real gift. Obviously I've got three children, and it's another reminder that one of my babies isn't with me."

Kate McCann with Aled Jones on Good Morning Sunday
Kate McCann with Aled Jones on Good Morning Sunday

Aled Jones with Good Morning Sunday, 14 March 2010
Aled Jones with Good Morning Sunday BBC Radio 2

14/03/2010

7 days left to listen (Kate McCann interview starts at 1:25:25)

Aled Jones says Good Morning Sunday to Kate McCann with faith guest Becky Silver

------------------------
Transcript

By Nigel Moore

Aled Jones: Now, it's almost three years since Kate and Gerry McCann's daughter Madeleine went missing from the holiday apartment in Portugal, where she was on holiday with her family. But Kate McCann's faith has helped her to cope with some of the darkest days. When I met her recently I started by asking her whether Mothering Sunday itself brings up mixed emotions for her?

Kate McCann: It does and it doesn't. I mean, every day, to be honest, is... is quite difficult. I guess Mother's Day is another reminder really that Madeleine's not here. You know, I think motherhood is a real gift and obviously I've got three children and it's another reminder that one of my babies isn't with me. But, you know, I'm still Madeleine's mum and I always will be.

AJ:
How do you cope with a day like Mothering Sunday?

KM: Well I guess its a little bit different now really, I think because we're... we're working so hard. Perhaps days where we maybe have done something really special, we don't necessarily; certainly Mothers Day and, I think, birthdays are different - children's birthdays, and things - but I think we just get through it like any other day really.

AJ: Do you get lots of support from family?

KM: Oh, we've had amazing support. I mean, our family have been great. I think that's an important point really because everybody in our family has suffered, and is going through a lot of pain and anxiety, and we're all missing Madeleine. But we've all gotta try and support each other.

AJ: And what about your other children? How aware are they of what's happening?

KM: Very aware. They talk about Madeleine every day. They know she's missing; they know she's been taken by somebody. They understand it a little bit like burgalry [sic] in that, even if you really want something, it doesn't mean that we can take it, because Madeleine belongs to us, you know, and it's not right that they've got Madeleine and need to find her. But they talk about finding her, about, you know, finding Madeleine, and running away with her and coming back home and even things like when we go on holiday, they say, "Oh, what will happen if the police find Madeleine and we're not there?", you know, and we say, "Oh, don't worry," you know, "our next door neighbours will let us know." And they're very aware but they're very positive. I mean, they'll always talk about when Madeleine comes home. Sean said to me the other week... well, Amelie said to me, "Why do you work, mummy?" and I said, "Well," you know, "I've gotta find Madeleine." and Sean said, "Yes, mummy, but when that's over; when Madeleine's home, what will you do?", you know, and you think, 'Oh, bring it on', you know.

AJ: Does that help you?

KM: It does. I mean, they always say, 'Out of the mouths of babes', you know, and, errm... they're really positive and it really does keep us going. I think, you know, in years to come I'll be able to tell Sean and Amelie just, errr... how important they've been, really, in our life; in keeping us going and getting us through it all.

AJ: What effect has... has time had on you? Has time healed at all?

KM: Yeah, it's always funny that line, isn't it? 'Time's a healer.' I think the wounds are less raw; the pain doesn't go away, and the anxiety is always there. I'm definitely a lot stronger than I was a year ago; which is positive. It's funny because sometimes you beat yourself up about that because, I think, 'How come I'm doing OK?' and 'I'm... I'm coping better than I was?' That's not right because, you know, nothing's changed for Madeleine but, yeah, it's important that I am because, you know, I've got three children; one to look for, and two to look after. Yes, it's important that I can cope.

AJ: Do you feel guilty being happy in a way then?

KM: Yeah, there is that element. I mean, I know it's okay to be happy, and it's important for Sean and Amelie that we do have happy times, but there is a little bit of guilt really and there's a little bit of discomfort in the... being able to adapt, I guess.

AJ: How important a word is 'hope' for you?

KM: Oh, very important. I mean, we've obviously got hope; we've got a lot of hope, really; a lot of hope that Madeleine's still alive. Obviously the difficult task is trying to find her. But whilst there's hope we'll keep going. I mean, certainly we'll never give up.

AJ: So what's Madeleine like?

KM: Oh, in some ways you just want everyone to meet her because, errm... she's just an amazing little character full of personality, loads of energy, quite knowing, errm... really funny and loving and, you know her relationship with Sean and Amelie is incredible really. And thats something that still gets to me at times when I see them playing and then they start talking about Madeleine. Again, you know, we were away and Sean was digging in a sand pit and I said, "What are you doing?" and he said, "Oh, I'm digging up buried treasure, mummy, and I'm going to give it to Madeleine". And you just kind of think, 'What would it be like if the three of them were together?', you know?

AJ: What are some of your most cherished memories?

KM: Oh God, there's lots. I mean I used to take Madeleine swimming on a Saturday morning and she used to have this really tight swimming cap on and I'd be watching through the glass and she was the youngest there; I mean, she was only three. And she'd just walk along on her own, really confident, and get in, and these huge eyes would be looking at me through the glass and she'd just be waving, you know, "Hello mummy!" I mean, I'd be texting Gerry saying, 'Oh, she's got me crying again!' And just lying with her, you know, and little conversations. You know, I'd... got to the stage where me and Madeleine would go for lunch together, you know, and it felt like a real girl's day out, and...

AJ: I know you are a person of faith which I would like to talk about after we've had some music. I don't know if you listen to music at all.

KM: No, we do. We listen to a lot of music. Its been a little bit strange to be honest because since Madeleine was taken from us I actually struggled quite a lot to listen to music and I'd... I'd actually put classical music on rather than anything remotely, I guess, happy, you know, with lyrics and stuff; dance type music, anything like that, but gradually I'm able to listen to it again now.

AJ: What would you like to listen to today?

KM: Chasing Cars by Snow Patrol.

AJ: Why Snow Patrol?

KM: Well this is a song that both myself and Gerry really liked and in fact, after Madeleine had gone, it was a song that was quite difficult to listen to, actually. It kind of made us both quite upset because it reminded us of happy times with Madeleine but, at the same time, it reminded us of Madeleine. So, from that point of view, it was quite a special song and I think also the lyrics, you know, "If I just lay here, wouldn't you lie with me?" and Madeleine often used to say at bedtime, "Lie with me, mummy," or "Lie with me, daddy," and, you know, they were really special, vivid moments.

(... Chasing Cars by Snow Patrol ...)

AJ: Snow Patrol there and Chasing Cars. The choice of my guest this morning, Kate McCann. Is every day bad?

KM: No, not every day's bad. But, its strange, I can have three or four days where, you know, the days just go basically. I'm working; I'm looking after Sean and Amelie; I get through a day; get up; same thing the next day. And then, something can suddenly, out of the blue, just really upset me and it can be something quite innocuous, and it will just trigger something and I guess you're aware that you don't have to scratch too far below the surface for that emotion to come bubbling out. You get through it. I mean, luckily the two of us together are... are quite a unit, really. Usually the one of us can pull the other on up when needs be.

AJ: And what does it feel like having the world's glare on you?

KM: Oh, I think you take it for granted really; what being anonymous was like. It's been very hard. I mean, I'm not the most confident person on the planet and I'd never be someone who would get up and give a presentation in work or anything, you know; I'd try and avoid it like the plague. But we've obviously been forced into this situation.

AJ: You've changed a lot as well haven't you? Because in the beginning you were very much in the background...

KM: Absolutely.

AJ: ...whereas now you're not.

KM: I think I was... well, obviously, I was going through a lot of pain and distress but also I was just really uncomfortable, as you say, being in the spotlight. And then I had to kind of say to myself, 'Well, why are we doing it?' We are doing it to try and find Madeleine and its not about me. It doesn't matter how uncomfortable I feel, you know, it's Madeleine that we're trying to help and forget about me, you know, move on, get over it, you know.

AJ: Are there times when you don't feel strong?

KM: Oh yeah, yeah... there are. I mean, there's been a lot of things in the last... almost three years. Errm... not even just Madeleine being taken away from us, which is obviously the worst, but there's been many things that have happened subsequently and they can obviously be really low times, dark times where you... you do doubt your faith, I have to be honest. But, at the same time, it's strange because we've been through that I do believe there's a... a greater good. In some ways it kind of strengthens my faith really.

AJ: Because in a way what you are experiencing for many people would be hell on earth.

KM: No, it is. I think it is the worst thing that could happen to a parent or certainly one of the worst things. I mean, the pain was just... it's just incredible and it's a pain, you know, the pain of worry, for her, really. I mean, we live with the sadness of not having Madeleine in our lives but, you know, I'm her mum and I can't help but worry about her and I just want to be with her. When she has a sore tummy, I want to be there. When she's upset, I want to be there. And I just want to bring her back into the warmth and love of our family, really.

AJ: Are there ever times when you blame God?

KM: I've never blamed God for what's happened, at all. I don't think that that was anything to do with God. There are times when I've got angry with God and certainly the... the additional things that I've mentioned that have happened, where I just think, 'How can we have extra suffering put on us, at such an awful time?' And I just haven't understood it, and I've wondered why God hasn't interceded and tried to counter that. These are the times when I go off to church, to be honest. I mean I've got a key to the church; they've kindly given me one and sometimes I'll go in and, oh, its a bit of a sanctuary, its a bit of a refuge really. I'll go and I can speak out because, obviously, there's no-one there. Just get it all of my chest, really. I mean, I do wonder, you know, why should God help my prayers when there's millions of people with prayers which are equally as important around the world. I don't know. I mean, I just hope he does. My faith has sustained me a lot through all of this and there is a definite comfort there.

AJ: Has your faith changed at all?

KM: I think it's probably got stronger. Definitely. I think, before all this happened, I'd never really had to question my faith. You know, it was there. I believed in God. I had little conversations with God in my head but I'd never really had to challenge it. I was just comfortable with my relationship with my faith, and with God. But it's definitely got stronger now. It's probably more intense. The day I was made arguido was quite an interesting day with regards to my faith. I'd had a period of about four to six weeks prior to that where there'd obviously been a shift in the investigation and suddenly none of the police were talking to us. We couldn't have a meeting, people didn't want to have phone conversations with us and we were left in this awful void of information, really. So we were trying to cope with the pain of not having Madeleine; but also not having any information, at all, and not knowing, at all, what was going on. And then that led into the period were suddenly there were these awful stories coming out in the media about supposed blood in the apartment and basically pointing the finger at us. And then obviously that subsequently finished with us being arguido and the day I was going in for my arguido interview it was quite a strange day because I had been really low and feeling quite weak and fragile, and then suddenly I just felt really strong. I mean, I was angry, I was angry that people hadn't been looking for Madeleine. But also I just thought to myself, 'I know the truth and God knows the truth and nothing else matters'. And I just felt really strong from there, I felt a real inner strength.

AJ: Do you think God's looking after Madeleine?

KM: I do. I mean, to me, Madeleine was a gift. Most of our life is pretty public anyway but obviously we had quite a difficult time trying to have Madeleine and when she was born I really did believe she was a gift and I never took her for granted... You know, every day when I'd wake up and I'd see her, these huge eyes looking at me, you know, I'd thank God for Madeleine and I don't believe that He would stop loving her now or abandon her, I mean, I don't believe that at all and I do get a comfort in thinking that wherever she... she is; whoever she's with, that He's with her and protecting her, and protecting her spirit. She's got a lot of spirit.

AJ: Do you find that your prayers have changed over the years?

KM: I guess they're a little bit more, errr... directed now. The prayer that I used to say all the time was, 'To... to keep my family, thank God for my family and to keep Gerry, Madeleine, Sean and Amelie safe, healthy and happy'. I always said that. Which, when it happened, to be honest, was a little bit of a... a struggle because that was the one prayer that I said all the time. You know, I pray for lots of things now, really. Obviously I always pray for the family; obviously most of the prayers are centred on Madeleine, really. But I pray for the people who have taken Madeleine, the people who know whats happened to Madeleine and the people around... related to the person who's taken Madeleine. I pray for the police and the investigators; people who are looking for her; and I pray for all the other children who are missing, or have been exploited in some way. Because in some ways... ehhh... it's funny to say lucky, but we have been lucky - we've had a lot of support from the general public, in particular people we don't know. I mean, we've had incredible support and there's many families out there whose children have gone missing and, you know, you don't hear about it.

AJ: Gerry said that his faith has been strengthened by the goodness generated by this ordeal. So there are positives that come out of it?

KM: Oh, very much so. I mean we... we still get a bundle of mail every day from people, you know, willing us on and, you know, sending their best wishes. And children send pictures for Madeleine and stuff; you know, we have books of prayers sent for Madeleine that children have written. Its been amazing, its been a real eye-opener. I mean, I'd have never thought of sitting down and writing a letter to somebody I didn't know who'd suffered a tragic event and yet the strength it's give us has been amazing.

AJ: You know, it would be understandable for you to be filled with hate and anger and rage and you're not at all?

KM: I've had my moments. If I went back to 2008, I think I did probably have a lot of anger on board and it's such a horrible negative emotion. I'm pleased to say that that anger has gone now. I feel so much better than I did in 2008.

AJ: Do you think you'd ever be able to forgive the people that took Madeleine?

KM: It's a difficult one, isn't it. I guess, I don't know why they've taken her and I think until I know that it would be hard... hard to say. I mean, I'd like to hope that I could but its difficult.

AJ: On Mothering Sunday, errr... do you have a message for other mothers who are maybe experiencing similar emotions to what you are going through?

KM: Yeah, I think, errm... dig deep really, just keep hoping and lean on your family and friends really. Gather their love, surround yourself with positive people but don't give up.

AJ: Thank you so much for talking to me.

KM: Thank you.

With thanks to Nigel at McCann Files

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